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Astro City #50

by Olivier Roth on January 31, 2018

Written by: Kurt Busiek

Art by: Brent Anderson

Colors by: Peter Pantazis

Published by: Vertigo Comics

 

In my last reviewed issue of Astro City, I mentioned how this was a comic I had always meant to read but never did. And really that’s almost criminal for a fan of comics because Busiek and Anderson bring something to comics that isn’t always seen: the human element.

 

The human element is not always there is comics because they are supposed to be about our favorite superheroes and wish fulfillment (in most cases). From the few issues of Astro City I’ve now read, those elements appear, but they are very much in the background of the comic. They are a means to an end essentially.

 

In this, the 50th issue, we aren’t treated to some big blowout between the Astro City superheroes like you would in most anniversary issues. We are instead treated to the aftermath of those blowouts. In essence, we get to see what happens to the victims of these superhero slobberknockers and how they cope with what happened to them.

 

How does Busiek and Anderson portray this? With Miranda’s Friends, a support group run by Michael Tenicek for people who have lost someone or been affected by superheroes and villains. Busiek smartly doesn’t delve too far into the reasonings for Mike’s creation of the group, but mainly focuses on those that attend. We get to know some of the regulars through Mike’s eyes and also get to see what he does to help them beyond the group.

 

As simple of a premise as it is, this issue continues to showcase Busiek’s brilliance as a writer of the comic form. A comic of this nature doesn’t always work, and probably doesn’t in most cases, but with his steady hand, you can’t help but feel the emotion. Couple that with Anderson’s art and you get an understated classic. A comic that may not set the world on fire, but that I would recommend to anyone who is a fan of the genre.

 

Oh, and Alex Ross on covers is always magnificent. That’s never up for debate.

Our Score:

10/10

A Look Inside