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Robotech #2

by Olivier Roth on August 30, 2017

Robotech #2

Script: Brian Wood
Art: Marco Turini
Colours: Marco Lesko
Published: Titan Comics

 

Coming on the heels of a pretty solid introductory issue, we are back this month with Rick Hunter and Lynn Minmei, two of our central heroes, about to come face-to-face with a massive alien being who has just emerged from a pod that has levelled a small portion of the city. What follows is a knockdown, drag-out fight between Rick’s stolen Veritech fighter against the alien, with some assist from his older brother.

 

Within Super Dimension Fortress One (SDF-1), the captain, Henry Gloval, is coming to the stark realization that this alien attack is very deliberate and has one goal: get SDF-1 to go to them. His solution, to “fold” - really to teleport - away from the battle to draw the attention of the attack away from Earth. Destination: the far side of the moon. Reality: a little further away than anticipated. This little tidbit leads me to believe that this will become the crux of at least the first arc of the series: getting SDF-1 back home.

 

While this is happening, we are introduced to the alien beings who are doing the attacking, and quite frankly, they weren’t really memorable once I got to the end of the issue. It just felt like two grunts doing running commentary on what the humans were doing. Hopefully in future issues they will be more fully developed and have an actual reason for being the villains of the story.  

 

From a storytelling perspective, Wood’s does the smart thing on the first page to give the reader a quick recap of the previous issues events. As they say, every new comic could be someone’s first, and when re-launching a new series of a beloved property, that statement is paramount in getting new readers.

 

Turini on art continues from last issue in giving the reader some crisp linework - his Veritech fighters look really good, and I do enjoy that they are distinctive enough from other mecha out there to make them easily recognizable.

Our Score:

7/10

A Look Inside