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Justice League of America #25 Review

by Hussein Wasiti on February 28, 2018

Writer: Steve Orlando

Artists: Miguel Mendonca and Minkyu Jung

Inker: Dexter Vines

Colourist: Chris Sotomayor

Letterer: Clayton Cowles

 

This issue is another over-sized anniversary issue, and unfortunately there isn't much story to be found here.

 

If you aren't aware, this series is ending with #29. With this, Steve Orlando has decided to go back and revisit the story of Angor and the Extremists, specifically Lord Havok, which I was not a fan of when the series first started. Hence the story is extraordinarily boring, made doubly so by the extra page count. The plotting is pretty poor as well. When the issue begins, I truly have no idea when this takes place in relation to the last issue. It looks like the JLA are trying to build a new base, with Frost in charge of the operation somehow?

 

Batman then reveals that he's going to Angor to attempt to save it, along with former Extremist Dreamslayer. And of all the characters he can take with him… he chooses to eventually bring along Black Canary? Sure, she was insistent, but bringing along the Ray or even Lobo would make more sense than Dinah. There are points in this Angor storyline where dialogue and beats just repeat themselves, obviously because of that extra page count that needs to be filled up. To make things worse, I have no idea how all of this connects to Ray Palmer and the Microverse. Orlando attempts to explain it, but it's incredibly confusing.

 

We have two artists on art duties, because of course DC couldn’t get one artist to do the whole book. Miguel Mendonca's art is a bit rough and rushed but I like Minkyu Jung's work whenever I see it, and it was fantastic here.

 

I don't think this series is going to end on a satisfying note. Surprise! All joking aside, this issue was nonsense and as padded as they come. The story simply doesn't support the over-sized format. Most of the art was good, but it came later in the issue.

Our Score:

4/10

A Look Inside