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Justice League of America #24

by Hussein Wasiti on February 14, 2018

Writer: Steve Orlando

Artist: Neil Edwards

Inkers: Daniel Henriques and Andy Owens

Colourist: Hi-Fi

Letterer: Clayton Cowles

 

This story only started in #22 but it feels like it's been going on for a lot longer than that, mostly because the story is very repetitive. The Queen of Fables, the villain of this story, isn't written very well. Steve Orlando attempts to make the reader empathise with her through the eyes of Caitlin Snow, Frost, but he's unsuccessful. She spews the same nonsense and jargon every single issue and I hope that we don't see her again, considering this is the finale of the story. With recent news that this series is ending with #29 in April, I wonder what this series will focus on in its final arc.

 

I think Orlando has been trying to build up the eventual confrontation between Frost and the Queen since the beginning of the story, but in doing so he has irreversibly damaged the character to me. In these past few issues, she has come across as incredibly selfish and very negligent of doing the right thing. This goes without saying, but she does do the right thing in this issue but the reason for this action is very vague and very confusing.

 

Controversy has abound after Orlando's inclusion of the Alan Moore/J.H. Williams III character Promethea in this storyline, and her presence in this story is very minimal and frankly entirely unnecessary. Her contribution to the story is played up by Orlando to be really important but I don't see why.

 

Neil Edwards is a personal favourite artist of mine and I really liked his work here. The last issue had some discrepancies due to having two different inkers onboard, but here it looks more consistent.

 

I'm glad this story is finally over, but I'm worried that we might be getting some filler in the next issues to tide us over until the series finale. The best part about this story has been Edwards' fantastic art, and I hope to see more of his work soon.

Our Score:

5/10

A Look Inside