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Green Arrow #27

by Hussein Wasiti on July 19, 2017

Writer: Benjamin Percy

Artist: Jamal Campbell

Letterer: Nate Piekos

 

We all know Green Arrow to be a politically-driven character, and we've seen a few instances of it here and there in his current series. This issue demonstrates the most politically-charged Green Arrow we've seen in a while, and it was a blast.

 

There are a few characters Benjamin Percy could have allied Oliver with in this issue. He could have gone with Superman, which is a more obvious answer. Instead he went with Wonder Woman, which is a different choice but also a sensible one. People forget her Golden Age origins of adopting the colours of the United States before arriving with Steve Trevor. She's a part of the American consciousness now more than ever before, and I applaud Percy's decision.

 

I wasn't a fan of Stephen Byrne's art last issue, and Jamal Campbell is an artist who I've only learned about due to his work on the Vixen one-shot earlier this year, written by Steve Orlando and Jody Houser. I'm a fan of his style; he colours his own art just as Juan Ferreyra and Otto Schmidt do, and it looks great. A panel portraying Oliver in front of an American flag near the end of the issue looked absolutely gorgeous, as did the entire issue. I also liked his portrayal of Wonder Woman, who is a little bulkier in this issue and less slender.

 

The story was a lot of fun. I don't like it when writers shove politics in my face but here it served the story. It spoke to today's situation with the U.S.'s current president and the whole political culture down under. Framing it as matching the ideologies of Green Arrow and Wonder Woman made it all the better.

 

In a very politically-charged and gorgeous issue, Benjamin Percy and Jamal Campbell join forces and team Green Arrow up with Wonder Woman. Their banter and relationship is a lot better established and genuine than Oliver's relationship with the Flash in the last issue, and the art was pretty gorgeous.

Our Score:

9/10

A Look Inside