comicsthegathering dot com logo

Action Comics #989

by Batmanaruto on October 11, 2017

Writer: Dan Jurgens
Artist: Viktor Bogdanovic
Colourist: Viktor Bogdanovic and Trevor Scott
Publisher: DC Comics


In the last few issues Mr Oz finally revealed himself to be Jor-El and we got a backstory for him. Jor-El was teleported to Earth and survived the explosion on Krypton, whilst on Earth  he familarised himself with tragedies that had happened in the past and also experienced some of his own. The general idea so far has been interesting, but the followthrough has been weak and unfortunately it is the same for this issue.
 
In this issue the main idea is that there is a terrorist who breaks into the Daily Planet and tries to kill those in the building as he believes that they are not printing the truth. This unfortunately is where I feel the book runs into its first problem as we don’t truly get to understand what he wants them to print or how the Daily Planet has been suppressing this truth. He seems to want them to print the fact that things are much worse than the Daily Planet are reporting. He mentions Mr Oz as a savior of sorts, but there is no indication of how this man knows Mr Oz. The actual execution of the story isn’t bad, but the premise from the get go is flawed.
 
Speaking of things that are flawed, is how Mr Oz seems to view humanity. Whilst Superman is helping protect citizens from a rocket, Mr Oz saves Lois from the terrorist who blows himself up. As Oz meets Lois he introduces himself as Jor-El and says that he admires how Lois adds to his son’s life. Surely if he thinks that Lois is good enough for his son, then he must believe that there are good people out there, which seems to be a flaw in his logic.
 
Action Comics #989 does have some interesting ideas in it admittedly, but unfortunately it feels like the ideas are not fully fleshed or executed well. These things may be improved on in the next issue, but so far in the Oz effect I am finding it underwhelming, as it retraces common tropes and clichés. 
 

Our Score:

5/10

A Look Inside